Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage
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TALBOT COUNTY

SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2016
10 am to 5 pm
RAIN OR SHINE

Special Project:  A portion of the proceeds from the Talbot County Tour will go to The Church of the Holy Trinity, Oxford, for the restoration of the structure supporting the historic church bell. The new structure will reflect and enhance the church’s neo-Gothic architecture designed in 1853 by noted church architect of that time, Richard Upjohn.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~HISTORY~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Talbot County is steeped in more than 350 years of American history. Named in honor of Lady Grace, wife of Sir Robert Talbot and sister of Cecilius Calvert, second Lord Baltimore, Talbot County was settled by the English about 1661. The Chesapeake Bay and some of its navigable tributaries — the Tred Avon, Choptank, Miles, Tuckahoe, and Wye rivers — provide more than 600 miles of waterfront for Talbot County. Easy water access for travelers and prospective traders trying to reach estates and towns alike helped to make this area an early settlement and it continues to draw countless visitors by “land and sea” today. Easton, the county seat since 1778, once was known as “Talbot Town.” Significant early political and legal history of the United States originated in Talbot County and local residents are justifiably proud of that history and the preservation of its prominent buildings, historic homes, and carefully tended gardens such as those you will visit today. Enjoy your Pilgrimage in Talbot County!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ DIRECTIONS ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

ROUTES

FROM BALTIMORE:
 East on Rt. 50 across the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. South on Rt. 50 to Rt. 322 (Easton Parkway). Bear right and go 2.0 mi. to 4th traffic light. Turn left onto Rt. 33 East (Bay Street). Proceed 0.5 mi. to traffic light at Washington Street. Turn right 0.2 mi. to the Talbot Historical Society on right adjacent to the municipal parking lot.

FROM WASHINGTON: Rt. 50 East across the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, then same as above.

FROM WILMINGTON & PHILADELPHIA: Interstate 95 South to Rt. 1 South (Christiana Mall exit). Take Rt. 299 West (Middletown) to Rt. 301 South. Continue on Rt. 301 to Rt. 213, exit turning left on to Rt. 213. Follow Rt. 213 to Rt. 50. Turn left on to Rt. 50 at the traffic light. Continue on Rt. 50 to Rt. 322 (Easton Parkway), then same as above.

FROM SALISBURY AND NORFOLK: Route 13 North to Salisbury; then Route 50 West to Easton. Exit left onto Route 322 Easton Parkway). At the third traffic light turn right on to Rt. 33 East (Bay Street). Proceed 0.5 mi to traffic light at Washington Street. Turn right 0.2 mi. to the Historical Society of Talbot County on right. Parking available in public lot beside the Society building.

FOLLOW PILGRIMAGE ARROWS AND SIGNS.

Information Headquarters: Gardens of the Talbot Historical Society adjacent to 25 S. Washington St., Easton, and next to the municipal parking lot. Information table will be manned from 10 AM until 2 PM the day of the tour. Tickets and Tour Books will be available at all sites on Tour Day. Questions the day of the tour may be phoned to Georgia Adler at 410-443-7542. Begin your tour at any site or as planned below.

Talbot Historical Society Gardens, 25 S. Washington Street

You are invited to tour the Historical Society’s Gardens that are maintained by Talbot County Garden Club members. Enter through the North Terrace on Washington Street. The hand-wrought iron gate was designed to complement the Charleston Gate at the far end of the garden and incorporates the Society’s “Star” logo. This charming entrance garden was designed with the assistance of noted garden designer Gordon Hayward to create a beautiful public entrance access to the larger garden. It includes dwarf boxwood, spring and fall blooming camellias, oak leaf hydrangeas and native Sweet Bay magnolias. The adjacent picket fence was designed after that at the Chase-Lloyd Garden in Annapolis. The South Terrace Garden was the gift of the Talbot County Garden Club in 1961 and was redesigned and replanted in 2015. The Nettie Jones Garden has rectangular beds and intersecting axis as is typical of classical garden design in the 17th and 18th centuries. The Alice D. Huxley Herb Garden in the right rear corner has a sundial as its focal point. Enjoy these beloved gardens.

From the Historical Society in Easton or the municipal parking lot next door, turn right on to Washington Street. Proceed 0.1 miles and turn left on to South Street. Turn right at the Stop Sign on to Harrison Street. Proceed 0.2 miles to 211 S. Harrison St. on your right. Parking is on neighborhood streets.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ LUNCH ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Reservations: A delicious box lunch, including dessert and drink, will be available by prior reservation only. The cost is $15.00 per person and your check will be your reservation. Please mail your check to the Talbot County Garden Club, P.O. Box 1524, Easton, MD 21601. Lunch must be reserved by May 6, 2016.

Lunch location: Box lunches may be picked up anytime between 10am and 2pm in Oxford at #9 on map, Oxford Community Center, 200 Oxford Road. Pause to enjoy inside or terrace dining or feel free to enjoy your box lunch at one of many beautiful spots in Oxford or along the tour route. Questions the day of the tour may be phoned to Jane Anderson at 703-963-7790.

Restrooms: Porta-johns located at 27999 Oxford Road, intersection of Oxford Rd. and Almshouse Rd, Oxford, behind the office of Benson & Mangold Real Estate. Additional facilities are available at the luncheon site.

 

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Talbot Historical Society Gardens, 29 S. Washington Street, Site #1 and Information Headquarters
 
You are invited to tour the Historical Society’s Gardens that are maintained by Talbot County Garden Club members. Enter through the North Terrace on Washington Street. The hand-wrought iron gate was designed to complement the Charleston Gate at the far end of the garden and incorporates the Society’s “Star” logo. This charming entrance garden was designed with the assistance of noted garden designer Gordon Hayward to create a beautiful public entrance access to the larger garden. It includes dwarf boxwood, spring and fall blooming camellias, oak leaf hydrangeas and native Sweet Bay magnolias. The adjacent picket fence was designed after that at the Chase-Lloyd Garden in Annapolis. The South Terrace Garden was the gift of the Talbot County Garden Club in 1961 and was redesigned and replanted in 2015. The Nettie Jones Garden has rectangular beds and intersecting axis as is typical of classical garden design in the 17th and 18th centuries. The Alice D. Huxley Herb Garden in the right rear corner has a sundial as its focal point. Enjoy these beloved gardens.
 
From the Historical Society in Easton or the municipal parking lot next door, turn right on to Washington Street. Proceed 0.1 miles and turn left on to South Street. Turn right at the Stop Sign on to Harrison Street. Proceed 0.2 miles to 211 S. Harrison St. on your right. Parking is on neighborhood streets.
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211 South Harrison Street – home of Dr. and Mrs. Ian Ferrier
 
Leaving behind the hustle bustle of market day in historic downtown Easton, you will turn on to Harrison Street, a wide and tree-lined street with large early 20th Century homes. This home, completed in 1911, is one of those designed by Frank Ross, a popular Easton architect of the time. What a treat to see this whole house from its unusual front yard driveway behind the hedge row, into the expansive and welcoming front hall, through the entire first and second floors. Throughout the home you will see beloved family Dutch antiques, framed drawings and paintings by the artist homeowner and those of many popular Eastern Shore artists, a collection of Nantucket baskets, unusual crystal chandeliers, a “snuggery” with upholstered walls, cozy chairs and family photos, and feel the warmth in the use of florals and color in the light, airy décor. Out in the large town garden you will find a round swimming pool, specimen plantings, ancient trees and espaliered apple trees. Do not miss the secret garden as you leave.
 
Continue tour across Harrison Street to #3, 100 Beech Place.

 

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100 Beech Place – home of Dr. and Mrs. Richard Schoeb
 
In the quiet cul de sac called Beech Place, make your way along restored original wrought iron fencing and gates to enter a green garden filled with specimen trees and shrubs with seasonal splashes of white. Tucked among the greens is sculpture—Oriental lanterns, birds and animals. Washington, DC architect Ward Bucher, AIA, designed the restoration to meet Historic District guidelines and Keith Neal of Nuttle Builders headed the construction. This 1923 home was called Villa d’Avoncoeur (the heart of the Avon) when nearby Brookletts Avenue was truly a stream feeding the Tred Avon River. The light-filled home, decorated in soft shades of yellows and browns, has been “filled with finds,” folk art and family antiques. The thoroughly modern kitchen, formerly the garage and raised three feet to meet the level of the house, enjoys radiant heat beneath the brick floor and an enormous granite-topped island. One entire wall of the dining room features hidden floor-to-ceiling cabinets holding exquisite collections of china and glass. Lining the long entrance hall to the charming master suite are wonderful built-in closets. His-and-hers studies, filled with personal treasures, anchor diagonally opposite corners of the home. As you leave the house, pause to take in the garden. The boxwoods, thought to be original to the house, dictate the outline of the garden. You must agree that the owners have found privacy and calm within walking distance of the center of the town of Easton.
 
Leaving 100 Beech Place – continue on Harrison Street for 0.3 miles to stop light. (Please note the garden diagonally across the street at the five-way light: The Villa Fountain Garden was designed and is maintained by the Talbot County Garden Club.)
 
Turn right at the light on to Peachblossom Rd. (Rt. 333). Proceed straight through the next traffic light at Route 322 onto the Oxford Road (Route 333). Continue 0.7 miles and turn right on to Cedar Point Road. Continue for 1.4 miles to #4.
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Cedar Point Farm - 27825 Cedar Point Road
 
 
 
Entering the cedar-lined lane at Cedar Point Farm you focus on the pillars of the white manor house that is situated on 30 acres at a bend of the Tred Avon River. The original house sat on two 1,000-acre land grants made by Lord Baltimore in 1659. Historical records first mention the farm in 1666 when John Edmondson, a leading Talbot County merchant, owned it but the oldest room in the house dates to about 1700. That small home, later a separate kitchen, is now a delightful library paneled with doors from the 18th century house. The central part of the house was rebuilt after a fire in the early 20th century, and a highlight is the surviving freestanding stairway with its mahogany newel and continuous ribbon maple baluster. Throughout the first floor you will feel the owner’s sense of humor and design with her mixes of the old and new, checks and toiles, prized antiques, and “coincidental treasures”—all to effect a luxurious country home. The white kitchen features a colorful collection of vintage enamelware. The two-story furnished porch overlooks the lawn to the river with ancient trees towering over younger replacement trees in the understory. As you walk the enchanting grounds, don’t miss the boathouse with its screened porch and the whimsical guest cottage with its Mad Hatter chandelier and 1940s retro red kitchen.
 
Exit Cedar Point Road. Turn right. Proceed 2.9 miles on the Oxford Road to Harleigh, 28181 Harleigh Lane. Turn into Harleigh Lane through elegant gates and proceed down the lane for 0.2 miles. Turn left, past the barn to the parking area for both Harleigh (#5) and Millwood (#6).
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Harleigh - 28181 Harliegh Lane
home of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Akridge, III
 
Life at Harleigh is all about the land—preservation and conservation; plants to welcome butterflies, birds and wildlife; gardens and grounds to enable farm-to-table eating and a cutting garden to bring the outdoors in. Historically, the 19th century house overlooking Trippe Creek, sits on land patented in 1663. A number of major restorations and additions have been made since the owners purchased the farm in the early 1980s, including adding more land for conservation, installing formal gardens, a pergola and terraces, geothermal air handling wells, a north wing to offset that to the south, and a new art studio. Visitors will enter the farm near the gardens and the house at its “working end,” viewing the pantry and kitchen before enjoying notable artwork and family treasures in the home where the color red prevails. A working farm, Harleigh is also a prime game hunting location and visitors will enjoy seeing the gunroom, changing lounge, and hunting art. Walk through the woods to see the “stumperie” and follies and, with a late spring, visitors may marvel at more than one million daffodils lining the driveway to the main house.

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Millwood – 5386 Oxford Road
 
Guesthouse of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Akridge, III
 
Feel free to wander the grounds, beneath 100-year-old trees, along mowed paths, and across quaint bridges to get a feel for the flora and fauna and life on the Eastern Shore as you wind your way along Raspberry Lane to the house and gardens at Millwood. Make your way to the friendly clapboard farmhouse typical of 20th century living on the Eastern Shore. The original house was three bays with room-over-room and a center hall. Many additions to the house have been made over the years, as have the various dependencies (none open today). In the original living room you will see a genuine 18th century “Trumeau” placed over the fireplace by a previous owner. Three generations of the present owner’s family use Millwood as a retreat and it even has a dollhouse in the “children’s corner” to entertain their smallest grandchildren. Across lush lawns and past the swimming pool, Trippe Creek is visible from nearly every room. Exit the property down a picturesque gravel lane, shaded by loblolly pines and maples.
 
Exit Millwood’s parking area by turning right on to the gravel lane. Turn left and proceed to the Oxford Road, and turn right. Continue for 1.8 miles, passing the rest stop on your left, to #7 at 27300 Oxford Road. Turn right and follow lane to parking.

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Kinsley - 27300 Oxford Road
 
Driving out from beneath the trees bending over the half-mile-long driveway you will feel as though you have stepped back 300 years. The exterior of the newly constructed Georgian brick house, built by the owner, Jay Heim, a professional builder, is a detailed copy of the original President’s House (circa 1730) at The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. It sits on the banks of Goldsborough Creek among mature trees where it is the centerpiece of an earlier plantation layout with its symmetry of formal gardens on one side and barns and outbuildings on the “working” side. The owners have always restored and lived in historic homes and this is their first “new-old” house. Utilizing all three floors, the couple has included a striking white marble kitchen with fireplace, a mudroom, porches, and living and dining rooms. Up a grand staircase, one finds a master suite, guest room, third floor family room, and an office—all with period woodwork, handmade cabinetry and hand forged door hardware. A timber frame barn replaced the original dairy barn. The boathouse also was replaced in the same way. The owners have added a kitchen garden and restored the earlier formal box gardens filled with outstanding specimen plants.

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Nonesuch Place – 5419 Morgan’s Point Road

Home of Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Gilson

When it came time for the well-traveled owners to choose a retirement location, there was no alternative to Talbot County where there were family roots going back many generations. In designing their new home the decision was to build a Tidewater house that looked as though it “belonged,” with the brick center section modeled after existing 18th century story-and-a-half homes in Talbot County. The master bedroom and kitchen wings look as if they had been added later and follow the customary telescope profile. Other details throughout the 10-year-old home also reveal this traditional thinking. As a retired landscape architect, the owner’s wife planned the house and gardens to take advantage of the quiet views of Cemetery Cove. A large arc of boxwood and nepeta organize the rear axis to complement the point of land that forms the back­yard. A perennial garden surrounds the pool, which is anchored by a gazebo situated to catch the summer breezes. Filled with family antiques, china, and travelers’ treasures, this last house is one you will not want to miss.

Exit Morgan’s Point Road, turning left on to the Oxford Road. Follow the

Oxford (Rt. 333) 8.2 miles to the intersection with Rt. 322 (traffic light).

To return to Baltimore, Washington, Wilmington or Philadelphia, turn left at the traffic light and follow Rt. 322 to Route 50. Head West on Route 50.

To return to Salisbury or Norfolk, turn right at the traffic light and follow Rt. 322

to Rt. 50. Head East on Route 50.

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Queen Anne’s County  |  Harford County  |  Talbot County  |  Baltimore County  |  Charles County



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