Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage
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BALTIMORE CITY: Guilford

Sunday April 25, 2010 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Rain or Shine

Click here to download a PDF with Directions, Tour Information and other Details.

 

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1. 4408 GREENWAY

This home was designed by Lawrence Hall Fowler, a noted local architect who designed over 60 houses in Roland Park, Homeland, and Guilford in 1924. This unique Georgian revival house sits recessed on a terraced lot. The first floor living room is designed to access the useable front lawnthrough the French doors. A brick pathway leads to the side entrance, which is covered by the original metal porch. This house features Flemish bond brick walls, a hipped slate roof, upper floor dormer windows on the side and rear, and an attached garage. In the interior, a vestibule and hallway lead to a grand staircase which accesses the second floor bedrooms. A servant's stair leads to the third floor servants' room. This elegant home features the original decorative woodworking, classic door surrounds, chair rail, carved wood fireplace mantles, and crown moldings.

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2. 101 STRATFORD ROAD

This unusual pink Mediterranean style house was designed by Lawrence Hall Fowler in 1925. The spacious first floor rooms feature many elegant French doors, which allow the beauty of the pool and rose garden to be enjoyed all year. The vast sunken living room has a soaring ceiling and a south facing window enhanced with traditional Mediterranean ironwork. The large formal dining room has a fireplace and a Venetian glass chandelier. There are wonderful architectural details throughout the house. The kitchen was recently renovated, combining two small rooms into a large, welcoming space with an antique country table and a collection of blue and white china.

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3. SHERWOOD GARDENS

Established in 1927 by John W. Sherwood, local petroleum pioneer and conservationist, the gardens were built on land once covered by a lake and have become one of the most famous tulip gardens in North America. When Mr. Sherwood died in 1965, he bequeathed sufficient funds to continue the gardens for one year. After that period, the Guilford Association purchased the garden from the Sherwood estate and took joint responsibility for its care with the City of Baltimore. Approximately 100,000 tulip bulbs are planted annually along with other spring-flowering bulbs. Dogwoods, wisteria, and magnolias bloom throughout the garden. Adding to the beauty of the gardens are numerous varieties of rare trees which comprise another aspect of Mr. Sherwood's interests. More than six acres in size, Sherwood Gardens has no gates, fences, or other barriers. 

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4. 4102 GREENWAY

This gracious Classical Revival Style residence was designed by the architect Louis Harold Rush (1880-1942) in 1916. Early maps of Guilford show this residence to be among the earliest built in this planned community. The Boyce family acquired the property in 1925 and made significant changes. The cloakroom was eliminated and the rear porch was added. Two stories were added above what is now the kitchen and pantry, including a sleeping porch. Many of the upstairs rooms were reconfigured. The garage was expanded as well. The front hall is done in soft neutral tones with Chinese details, and showcases the original hall fixture. The living room is also in neutral tones with botanicals and birds in both art and decorative arts. The dining room is a rich red with red and gold drapes and blue and white china. Throughout the house is a remarkable collection of period furniture and significant artwork.

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5. 4100 GREENWAY

Designed by Edward J. Palmer, Jr. and built in 1914, the home exhibits all the symmetry and detail associated with this historic style of architecture. Of particular interest are the first floor mantels, beams, door surrounds, and ceiling moldings, all of which bear the original detail and finish. The home's three main floors have six fireplaces, six bedrooms, and four and one half baths in addition to a living room, dining room, library, study, and sunroom. According to the current owners and stewards, the home still agrees with its original plans with the exception of the kitchen and the bathrooms, all of which have been updated

 

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6. 210 LAMBETH ROAD, Garden Only

This 1926 Georgian colonial, designed by Frederick Thomas, is graciously enhanced by a beautiful series of garden rooms. The home is positioned in the corner of a double lot. The large property allowed for a comprehensive landscape plan which divided the large property into four distinct areas—a formal terrace, pool area, an informal lawn area and a secret garden. The patio and grassy terrace, bordered by a yew hedge, provide a path to the pool area. The black-bottom pool is surrounded by a stone wall, lovelybluestone patio, grassy border, and cutting garden. Mature hedge rows of hollies, laurels, upright yews and Leyland cypress help enclose the garden and create the different rooms. The informal lawn area, once an open space, is surrounded by evergreens and a woodland garden. The oval shaped secret garden is the crown jewel of this backyard retreat with its unusual Tiger Eye pine.

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7. 205 E. HIGHFIELD ROAD

This stately Georgian Colonial was built for Dr.William Holland Wilmer in 1925. The elegant entry way leads into the formal living and dining rooms. The matching chandeliers in the living room are original to the home, having been in the dining room and entry prior to their current position. Note the spectacular Palladian window on the second floor and the exquisite views of the Sherwood Gardens. The basement of the home has been transformed into an amazing adult retreat. The foundation was dug out to create the library. The floor in the wine cellar is from an old Parisian chateau. Additionally, the home boasts original doors, windows, hardware, as well as the moldings and marble surrounds on the seven working fireplaces. The current owners acquired the adjacent property, razed the existing home and began work on transforming the outdoor area. An outdoor kitchen, fireplace, dining terrace, and pergolas were built around a new pool and pool house.

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8. 219 NORTHWAY

The original portion of this stately home was constructed in 1918 for the first owners of the home, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Patterson. He was the publisher of the Baltimore Sun and she was a member of the Abell family from whom the Guilford estate was purchased. The large three-story addition on the west side of the home was built in 1925. The interior of the house features original random width, oak peg flooring and magnificent paneling. The large rooms are furnished mainly with antique furniture. The east, south, and west sides of the grounds are extensively gardened and are in bloom from March through December.

 

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9. 217 NORTHWAY

This Palmer, Willis and Lamdin stucco house was constructed in 1927 as a wedding present from the bride's family. The back garden leads into a private park for the use of the neighbors in the surrounding block. The subsequent owners made three additions to the house in 1955, 1965, and 1985 to include a library, garden room, terrace, second floor sitting room and deck, as well as four basement rooms. The fine Oriental rugs and lovely inlaid furniture provide an impressive private collection.

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10. 4412 N. CHARLES STREET

In 1915, a large elegant Italianate/Mediterranean Renaissance house, having eclectic features, was constructed on three lots fronting N. Charles St., a gateway street into Guilford. Designed by architect Otto G. Simonson and built for Frank Gunther, it has 10 and one-half inch thick exterior and interior walls. This substantial house has magnificent stained glass windows on the second floor landing, original Tiffany lighting fixtures, and splayed red oak paneling in the dining room as well as elaborate moldings found throughout the house. The French Baroque reception room has a German Baroque desk as well as a Chippendale mirror. Twenty stations from which to call staff are listed on the third floor callboard.

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11. 4300 ST. PAUL STREET

This stately grey granite house designed by architect George R. Callis, Jr. was built in 1916 and has 20 rooms. The owners and their daughter are responsible for planting the entire garden and the trees, featuring oak leaf hydrangeas, peonies and fruit trees. The gracious driveway is constructed of Belgian Stone. The owners have restored the entire property, including all of the electrical wiring. The home features English and Italian oak furniture as well as stunning decorative furnishings. Taxidermy pieces abound, with about half acquired in England and half acquired locally from a prominent Roland Park family. There is also an extensive Majolica collection.


Baltimore City (Guilford) | Baltimore County | Montgomery County | Charles County | Talbot County | Cecil County




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