Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage
maryland house and garden pilgimage
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anne arundel county:
bay ridge

Saturday, May 16, 2009 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Access by Shuttle System Only - No Parking on Bay Ridge Roads
This tour is accessible only via the free shuttle system, beginning at the Phillip Merrill Environmental Center, headquarters for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, located at 6 Herndon Avenue.  Parking on county roads within the community of Bay Ridge is illegal and strictly enforced.  Any cars parked on the streets will be ticketed and towed.  The tour is walk-able, approximately 4 ½ miles for a full loop.  There will be multiple stops and you may combine walking and riding the shuttle.  Tickets and maps will be provided at check-in at the Merrill Center.  Restrooms will also be available at the Merrill Center.

C0 Chairmen: Sharon A. Kennedy and Julie Lundblad

Special Project: Proceeds from the Anne Arundel County Pilgrimage will benefit the Charles Carroll House and Gardens in downtown Annapolis.  This remarkable urban landscape and Georgian mansion is the birthplace of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic Signer of the Declaration of Independence, as well as the last living Signer.  The specific project is the restoration of the front door of the House.  Additionally, the funds may underwrite the purchase of upgraded heating and cooling systems to protect the collection of original 18th century plasterwork, which survives on the interior of the home.

Luncheon: A delicious box lunch will be available between 11:30 and 2:30 at the Bay Ridge Marina Clubhouse.
The cost for lunch is $15 per person and your check will be your reservation.
Please mail your check to Deborah Webster-Cornell,
1007 Dreams Landing Way, Annapolis, MD 21401 
or email her at atticusthecat@comcast.net
or call 410.224.0031. 
Reservations must be made no later than May 10, 2009.

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~HISTORY~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Bay Ridge is a small residential community located on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay three miles southeast of Annapolis, at the end of the Annapolis Neck peninsula. For over three centuries the history of Bay Ridge has paralleled that of other waterfront communities along the upper Chesapeake Bay. The land was settled more than 350 years ago by Thomas Tolly, who gave his name to the point where the Severn River meets the Chesapeake. For the next two centuries, the land was farmed by several owners, none of whom made it a principal residence. Benjamin Ogle, governor of Maryland in the late 1700s, patented the farm as Ogleton, a name now extended to the lake on its western boundary. Bay Ridge was developed in 1879 as a summer resort, with a large Victorian hotel at Tolly Point. First served by steamboats from Baltimore and Annapolis, the resort soon proved popular enough to warrant its own railroad. The Bay Ridge and Annapolis Railroad was built in 1886, and for the next 17 years, thousands of people came by rail and water to enjoy the “Queen Resort of the Chesapeake.” Chief among its attractions were the gravity road, the hotel, dining and dancing pavilions, all-day band concerts, picnic grounds, and a two-mile electric trolley ride that wound along the river and the lake shores. The resort closed in 1903, and there was little interest in the area until 1922 when the Bay Ridge Realty Company began selling small lots on streets named for naval heroes. Within five years, some one hundred families had built summer cottages in the community.  Bay Ridge remained largely a summer haven until World War II, when the need for year-round rental housing in the Annapolis area led many owners to winterize their cottages. Since then, the community has changed gradually from summer resort to permanent home for more than 400 families, and today just a handful of its dwellings are used only during the summer.

Based on “Bay Ridge on the Chesapeake” by Carol Patterson and Jane McWilliams
Published in 1986 by Brighton Editions, P.O. Box 3158 Annapolis MD 21403

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ DIRECTIONS ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

From Annapolis: Take Route 50 West.  Exit onto Aris T. Allen Blvd (Route 665) heading East (Exit 22). DO NOT EXIT ONTO RIVA ROAD.  Go approximately 2.8 mi. and Aris T. Allen Blvd. becomes Forest Dr. Go approximately 2.2 mi. and Forest Dr. becomes Bay Ridge Rd. Go approximately 1.6 mi. and turn right on to Herndon Ave. (next to sign for Bay Ridge Community and just past two brick pillars). GO SLOWLY — Speed limit on Herndon Ave. is 25 mph and is strictly enforced. Go approximately 0.5 mi. and turn right at the CBF sign. Proceed down driveway and park in the front parking lot.

From Baltimore: Take Route 97 towards Annapolis, then US 50 East.  Immediately exit onto Aris T. Allen Blvd. (Route 665) heading East (Exit 22). DO NOT EXIT ONTO RIVA ROAD.  Then as described above.

From Virginia/DC: Take US 50/301, then Route 50 East.  Exit onto Aris T. Allen Blvd. (Route 665) heading East (Exit 22). DO NOT EXIT ONTO RIVA ROAD. Then as described above.

From Maryland's Eastern Shore: Go over the Bay Bridge, then US 50 West. Exit onto Aris T. Allen Blvd. (Route 665) heading East (Exit 22). DO NOT EXIT ONTO RIVA ROAD. Then as described above.

 

 

tourschedule

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1. 7 Bay Drive - Garden Only

This house was constructed in 1970 by a Bay Ridge summer resident since his childhood.  The most arresting part of the front garden landscape is the series of topiary hollies, each over 25 feet tall, maintained personally by the homeowner.  The driveway is framed with spirea and leads to the surprising back garden.  Banks of azaleas and oak leaf hydrangeas frame the perimeter.  A perennial shade garden features dicentra spectabilis (bleeding heart) and both koi and goldfish inhabit the pond.  Along the stone pathways throughout the garden, there are plantings of tulips, Virginia bluebells, pansies, peonies and larkspur.  Russian olives line the back property line with evergreen silver leaf, magnolias, quince, and crape myrtle.  Some of the most unusual aspects of the garden are the numerous handcrafted copper sculptures created by the homeowner.  Nestled in the far corner is a child’s playhouse, also built by the owner. 

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2. 39 Bay Drive - Garden Only

Following the flagstone paths, this remarkable landscape includes a large variety of native and non-native specimen plantings as well as numerous water elements.  Past the front door, descending along the left side of the house, the alternating rhododendrons and azaleas create an engaging pattern. To the right is a gentle waterfall.  Turn left at the first fork marked by a pair of urns and meander throughout the large bamboo stand, noting the various benches and statuary (including bunnies, foxes and dogs as well as several sundials) scattered along the way.  The winding stone paths throughout the landscape are bordered by a variegated holly hedge, tri-color St. John's wort, ajuga with its blue blossoms and more azaleas and rhododendrons. Descending into the lawn area, directly ahead is the magnificent “Salix Babylomica Variegated Pekinensis” or commonly known as Corkscrew Weeping Willow, a focal point in the back garden.  To the left is an alfresco dining area.  The koi ponds are located at the base of the rear garden.  Exiting the property along the driveway, note the wisteria laden trellis as well as a 1920s wood kayak suspended overhead.

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3. 25 Barry Avenue

This is the oldest house existing within the community of Bay Ridge and the only remaining structure from the resort era.  The house was built in 1893 and a major addition was constructed in 1910.  Originally, this structure served as the home and studio of the Bay Ridge photographer.  The house survived the devastating fire of 1915 that destroyed the hotel, mainly through the efforts of Mrs. Buffhorn (the photographer’s wife), who watered down the surrounding area using well water as the fire raged.   The most recent renovation occurred in 2000 and reflects the current owner’s passion for Hawaii and surfing.  Additionally, the tropical cottage style was inspired by the history of the Bay Ridge resort beach from 1939-41 when it was fondly dubbed “Tahiti Beach North” complete with palm-frond huts, tiki statues and coconuts. 

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4. 76 River Drive

This house on River Drive is sited on a gentle rise facing the Bay, and was originally built as a single story ranch in 1960.  The house remained a one story dwelling until 1997 when the current owners designed and then built a new structure on the existing foundation in a Queen Anne style beach cottage. The residence is two and one half stories, finished with a classic gambrel roof line.   The roof was constructed with traditional skip sheeting, allowing the cedar shingles to breath and age for a long life.  Typical of Nantucket Island houses, the cedar shake roof and white cedar siding have faded to natural grey tones over time.  Tasteful wood trim accents the windows and doors as well as key architectural exterior features.  True divided light double hung windows are placed to maximize light from the expansive views over the Severn River and Chesapeake Bay. On the interior, the main stairway is curved and open to all three floors with a third floor skylight illuminating multiple levels. The floor plan is open and one can walk completely around the central stairway to each room on both the first and second floors.  There are three wood burning fireplaces and two chimneys, designed by the owners. The third floor is a working artist’s studio.

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5. 114 River Drive - Garden Only

This traditional New England shingle style house was inspired by summers spent in Nantucket.  Built in 2007, the house was designed to embrace the expansive views of the Chesapeake Bay, the Bay Bridge and the town of Annapolis.  The gardens were designed by local landscape architect, Gay Crowthers.  The grasses found in the front of the house express the simplistic feel of the Bay.  The rear garden, which was dictated by the owners’ love of Nantucket landscapes, includes hydrangeas, light pink roses, dogwoods, and crape myrtle.  There is also an English-style cutting garden producing material from spring through fall.  Native species of mature, as well as young trees, were planted throughout the property.  There are a series of garden boxes, raised to form sitting ledges, a pool and guest house all of which combine to allow for extended family gatherings and entertaining. 

 

 

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6. 1 East Lake Drive

This charming Arts and Crafts style, one -story house was built in 1926 by the original owner, Herbert Ludwig.  In the 1940s, subsequent owners added several rooms and outbuildings to the property and eventually named the home Dun-building, as they completed the expansion.  The small building standing on the rear of the lot was originally constructed as a pottery studio for an artist-owner in the 1960s.  Major renovations in the 1990s included installation of an updated kitchen, the custom built stacked stone fireplace, a guest loft and new landscaping, including creative water elements.  The current owners have enclosed the porch to create additional space and upgraded the outbuilding for use as both an art studio and workshop.

 

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7. 17 Sands Avenue

This lovely waterfront home retains its original footprint to a large extent, having only been expanded by a total of 94 square feet over several decades.  The façade facing the street is fundamentally unchanged from its first period construction, while the waterfront façade reflects a more contemporary approach.  Deep overhangs on the screened porches, beaded board paneling, random width antique oak flooring and large sliding glass doors all contribute to the “cottage” feel of this home.  A new kitchen was installed in the former sunroom allowing for a modern open floor plan that connects the living room and breakfast areas.  The living room features a stunning limestone fireplace selected for its light color and appealing texture.  The color palette for the entire home is based on an heirloom quilt owned by the family.

 

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8. 66 East Lake Drive

Designed by Annapolis architect Robert G. Hammond, the 6,000 square foot residence is the owner’s second home in the same location.  The shingle style house with gambrel roofs and dormer windows replaced a 1980s contemporary house that was damaged by Hurricane Isabel in 2003.  Careful design and engineering as well as critical area regulations were important components in the creation of a livable home for a busy family with three active boys.  Rather than rooms created by walls, open space was segmented by coffered ceilings, area rugs and the arrangement of furnishings, which allows for stunning open waterfront views.  Where one would expect a formal dining room, a centrally located billiard table sets the tone for casual entertaining throughout the house.  Interior designer Cathy Belkov, who worked on the home says, “Like the houses of Nantucket, this home is an example of timeless elegance and charm.  The furnishings include warm woods, leather, stone and iron along with richly toned area rugs and soft neutral fabrics.  The wheat tones in the tidal grasses around the Chesapeake Bay and the blue-green hues of Lake Ogleton outside the back door are evident in the wall tones and artwork.”

 

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9. 170 West Lake Drive

This lovely house was built in 2003; however, the property has been in the family since 1967.  At that time, the existing summer cottage was in such a state of disrepair that one of the current owners cried when she first viewed the property while her husband saw the enormous potential, which has been realized in the current contemporary structure.  The granite floor flowing from the front entryway through the interior living space and on to the waterfront patio connects all three elements of the house. The living space level includes a sunroom, dining room, kitchen with brick and cherry accents, a game/bar area as well as a living room.  Maple flooring is used throughout, including the staircase featuring open treads and steel balustrades.  Both levels showcase see-through fireplaces, including the upstairs glass hearth allowing light to accentuate the library.  The library also possesses a “secret” door built into the bookshelves, which when opened reveals a modern office. 

 

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10. 212 West Lake Drive - Garden Only

This property is a complete renovation of a 1930s ranch home, waterside pool and gardens.  The goal of the renovation, designed by Purple Cherry Architects of Annapolis, was to provide a welcoming home for family and friends while respecting the traditional architecture of the community and the environmentally sensitive critical areas which surround the site.  Entering the driveway, family and friends are greeted by an ever-changing but traditional garden designed by Mimi Armstrong.  This portion of the garden offers privacy and seasonal blooms for the kitchen table.  Early spring brings magnolias, lilacs, daffodils, tulips, Siberian irises, peonies and viburnums.  Many of these specimens were taken from older, more established gardens out of state. To the left of the front door and buttressed by the east wall of a carriage style garage and workshop, lies a courtyard filled with Endless Summer hydrangeas and rudbeckias.  To the right side of the house is a fieldstone chimney faced with climbing hydrangeas and flanked by echinacea, peonies and day lilies.  Access between the front and back yards is via a hand crafted wrought iron gate. The fieldstone of the chimney is repeated in the support pillars of the outdoor dining porch and deck.  The stone has also been incorporated into a graded wall, which provides a soft and natural backdrop for the homeowners’ summer garden, which includes wegelias, purple verbena, soft pink Knockout roses and a variety of beach grasses.  On the left and at a higher grade level is a bluestone patio and pool surrounded by hollies, boxwood, dianthus, Annabelle hydrangeas and lavender, providing a fragrant entertaining and resting spot for the family.  Continuing along the pool and down the far stairs, discover another spring garden with bleeding heart, scented geraniums and Nikko Blue hydrangeas.

 

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11. 219 West Lake Drive

This new Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired house was built for three distinctly different water views with 105 windows wrapping each floor in natural light.  This contemporary residence invites one inside through a very large and deep front porch, which is enjoyed rain or shine by the family and looks out towards the main body of Lake Ogleton.  While designing this house, the family lived for 2 years in existing cottages on the property and discovered the incredible breezes that flowed across the site from the waterfront location.  This experience was incorporated into the final design resulting in the large entryway, breezeway construction and large open stairway, which in combination naturally ventilate the house through a Jefferson Dome effect.  The design of the entire house takes into account high energy costs and, through the use of extra large overhangs, triple glazed low-E windows and installation of extra insulation, seeks to be environmentally sensitive.  The second floor hosts the family bedrooms while the third floor pavilion was designed for fun.  The pavilion features a large alfresco dining area with 270 degree views of the water.  A large dumb waiter services this area from the first floor main kitchen.

 

Queen Anne's County | St. Mary's County | Harford County | Baltimore City: Homeland
Anne Arundel County: Bay Ridge | Baltimore County: Western Run and Worthington Valleys



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